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Contact Lens Frequently Asked Questions

We have put together a list of the most common questions received by our doctors and staff.

  1. Can I wear soft contact lenses if I have astigmatism?
    Yes, you can wear a special type of soft contact lens called a toric lens which will correct your astigmatism. However, these lenses are typically more expensive and there are fewer types and colors available than there are with regular (spherical) lenses. Recently, Wesley-Jessen introduced a 2-week disposable toric lens, the Freshlook Toric. Several manufacturers including Ciba (Focus) and Coopervision (Preference) produce 1-3 month frequent replacement toric lenses.

     

  2. Is a contact lens prescription different than a glasses prescription?
    Yes. When you order contact lenses, you must have a current contact lens prescription which specifies the power of the lenses, the size of the lens, the type and brand of lens.

     

  3. If my 2 week disposable lenses are still comfortable and in good condition beyond 2 weeks, can I continue to wear the same pair?
    In order to maintain optimal eye health and comfort, it is important to adhere to the wearing schedule prescribed by your doctor. The main advantage of wearing disposable lenses is that you are putting a fresh new pair of lenses in your eyes every 2 weeks. Also, the convenient cleaning regimen of a disposable lens is only adequate for a 2 week wearing schedule.

     

  4. If I only wear my 2 week disposable contacts part time, do I still have to replace them every 2 weeks?
    No, the 2 weeks refers to the actual amount of wearing time so they can last longer than 2 weeks if you are not wearing them full time.

     

  5. What's the difference between rigid gas permeable (RGP) lenses and soft lenses?
    RGPs are smaller and made out of a harder, less pliable material than soft lenses which makes them less comfortable initially. RGPs correct astigmatism whereas soft spherical lenses do not.

     

  6. Can I swim with my contact lenses in?
    It is best if you don't because there are bacteria in the water that can adhere to your lenses and cause infections. If you do swim in your lenses, you should wear goggles over them and you should disinfect them immediately afterwards.

     

  7. Why is it necessary for contact lens wearers to have regular eye exams even if their prescription hasn't changed?
    Regular eye exams are important not only to check your prescription but also to evaluate the health of your eyes. This is especially important for contact lens wearers because the contacts could be causing damage to your eyes without necessarily causing any obvious symptoms.

     

  8. Is my doctor required by law to release my contact lens prescription.
    The laws vary from state to state, but in most places the doctor is required to release your prescription once the fitting is complete (this may include the initial exam and one or more follow-up visits). Your doctor is not required to release an expired prescription and in any case we would be unable to dispense contacts from an expired prescription. Some doctors are more ready to comply with local laws than others.

     

  9. I wear contact lenses and in order for me to read, I have to wear reading glasses over them. Are there any other alternatives whereby I don't have to wear glasses at all?
    Yes, the most common option is called monovision where one eye is corrected for viewing distant objects and the other eye is corrected for reading and close work. Monovision is a good solution for some people, but not everbody can successfully adapt to the arrangement. Another alternative is bifocal contact lenses which are available in both rigid gas permeable or soft lens designs. However, these are typically very expensive. Recently, however, Johnson and Johnson have released the Acuvue Bifocal which is a two-week disposable lens and is more reasonably priced.

     

  10. Do colored contact lenses work on dark eyes?
    Yes, they are called opaque contacts as opposed to enhancer tints which work only on light colored eyes. Year-long (daily wear and extended wear) opaque contacts are available in many different colors and shades but there is currently only one brand that offers a 2 week disposable opaque lens. These are Freshlook Opaques by Wesley-Jessen.

     

  11. Do I still need a prescription if I just want contacts to change my eye color?
    Yes, you still need to be fitted for the lenses even if you don't need vision correction. This is because contact lenses are medical devices and wearing them can affect the health of your eyes.

     

If you could not find the answer to your question simply fill out the form below. We will try to get the information you need as soon as possible. (Generally, you can expect a response to your inquiry within 1 to 2 days.)

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